Tag Archives: Chris Worley

Red Wolf

Red Wolf

Red Wolf: Richard Merrill and Chris Worley created this lifelike wolf, using more than 2,000 slivers of steel to suggest the wolf’s fur. Originally commissioned by Ann DerGara for her gallery on Main Street, the red wolf now stands near the courthouse gazebo. The sculpture features a steel heart inside. Red wolves once were common throughout the Southeast, but had virtually disappeared by the 1960s. A program to breed the few remaining wolves in captivity was success-ful, and packs were restored to various sites throughout the country, including North Carolina, in the late 1980s. Today, about 100-120 red wolves roam in five northeastern counties of the state.

red wolf

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Blue Heron

Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron: The stately bird, often found around the French Broad River, is recreated in galvanized steel with a blue patina. Sculptor Chris Worley fabricated individual feathers to create a lifelike look for the bird, which stands in a rain garden in front of the Transylvania County Library on Gaston Street. The sculpture includes a viewing bench. The great blue heron is called the official bird of the French Broad River.

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Eagle

Eagle

Golden Eagle: This magnificent bird is made of hand-forged steel and copper, each feather in its impressive 5 foot wingspan individually forged by sculptor Chris Worley. The eagle is on the front lawn of the Transylvania County Arts Center on Caldwell Street.

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Cougar

Cougar

Cougar: The elusive creature is captured in abstract form by Chris Worley. The steel cougar stands at the back of First Citizen’s Bank on Caldwell Street. The legend goes that you could see creature only briefly, but then it would disappear, almost before your eyes. If you stand in front of the sculpture and lean slightly to the right or left, you will find that the sculpture “disappears” into the rocks.

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Deer

Deer

Deer: The shy deer stands at the edge of South Broad Park, where it can be seen by both walkers and drivers. Richard Merrill and Chris Worley created the deer, using a large, flat river rock for its body, and forged steel for its legs, head, and antlers. The rock was not cut, but rather found in a stream in the natural shape of a deer’s body.

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